Narcan a live saving drug you can carry to prevent opioid overdoses

Carry Narcan to Prevent Overdose Deaths

The ongoing opioid epidemic is a significant concern in the United States. Unfortunately, more and more people are dying from overdoses each year, and we all must do our part to help. One way to help prevent overdose deaths is by carrying Narcan (naloxone). This drug can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose and save someone’s life. In this blog post, we will discuss the importance of carrying Narcan, how to use it in case of an overdose, and how it can be obtained.

Opioid Overdose Deaths in the United States

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opioids cause more drug overdose deaths than any other substance. Overdose deaths from opioids accounted for 74.8% of drug overdose deaths in 2020. In addition, a majority of opioid-related overdose deaths involved synthetic opioids, accounting for 82.3%.

Overdose deaths have increased across the country from 2019-2020, indicating a continuing need for prevention efforts. Texas is among the states with a significant increase. During that period, the number of overdose deaths in Texas increased by 30.6%.

What are the Signs of an Opioid Overdose?

There is a risk of death associated with overdosing on opioids. Therefore, it is imperative to get emergency medical attention for an individual as soon as possible by calling 911. The first step in responding to an opioid overdose is recognizing the signs immediately.

  • Examine their face. Overdosing on opioids makes a person look extremely pale. There is also a possibility that their lips will be discolored.
  • Observe their eyes. They will appear to have small, constricted pupils.
  • Feel their skin. It will feel cold and clammy.
  • Take a look at their fingernails. Their color will be purple or blue.
  • Take note of their body language. In the event of an opioid overdose, the body will become limp.
  • Observe how they breathe. When an individual overdoses on opioids, their breathing rate slows, and their heart rate slows or may stop.
  • Overdose symptoms may include wet, gurgling sounds and vomiting.
  • The person may not be able to be woken up or be unable to speak.

Carry Narcan to Prevent Overdose Deaths

Whenever someone overdoses on opioids, immediate treatment is necessary to prevent life-threatening consequences. In the event of a suspected overdose, you should call 911 first, followed by administering CPR (if you are trained in that procedure) until emergency medical assistance arrives. It is vital to keep the person who is overdosing awake and to lay them on their side in the recovery position to prevent choking. The life-saving drug naloxone, known as NARCAN, should be administered as soon as possible.

How to Administer NARCAN

Since NARCAN comes in a nasal spray, it doesn’t require needles like injectable naloxone. Therefore, there is no need for specialized training or set-up to administer it. However, in some cases, a second dose may be necessary depending on the type of opioid the person used and how they used it.

The manufacturer’s directions for administering NARCAN are as follows:

  • PEEL – Peel back the package to remove the device. Place your first and middle fingers on either side of the nozzle.
  • PLACE – Place and hold the tip of the nozzle in either nostril until your fingers touch the bottom of the patient’s nose.
  • PRESS – Press the red plunger firmly to release the dose into the patient’s nose.

NARCAN doesn’t replace emergency medical attention. Its effects wear off within 30-45 minutes.

The Use of NARCAN Carries a Low Risk

NARCAN has a long history of being used to reverse the effects of opioids on the brain and respiratory system and to prevent overdose deaths from opioids in the medical community. The risk is generally low, and NARCAN can be given safely to people who have not used opioids in the event you are unsure if they are overdosing. However, people who regularly use opioids may experience side effects from taking NARCAN. Their side effects can include body aches, diarrhea, increased heart rate, and fever, which are all related to opioid withdrawal.

How to Obtain NARCAN

The NARCAN drug is available in all 50 states, including Texas. Most states allow you to get it at your local pharmacy without a prescription. Those who have been prescribed high-dose opioids may ask their doctors for NARCAN prescriptions. There is a possibility that insurance will cover a portion of the cost. NARCAN and similar products are also made available for free to opioid users through community-based naloxone programs. 

No one deserves to die from an overdose, and carrying NARCAN can help you save a life. Be sure to keep it with you at all times, and don’t hesitate to use it if you think someone might be overdosing. It could be the difference between life and death.

 

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s board-certified medical professionals and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Bedroom at Restored Path Detox where our patients can safely withdrawal from substance use disorders.

How to Identify the Need for Medical Detoxification

By: Rick Hubbard, Executive Vice President of Professional Relations

Substance use disorders often begin when someone uses a substance to cope with stress, loss, trauma, or other difficult life events. Continued use of the substances can lead to physical dependence, which means the body becomes used to having the substance in its system and starts to experience withdrawal symptoms without it. Many of the individuals who become physically dependent upon a substance are seeking a way to reverse course and eliminate the chemicals from their bodies without the pain and discomfort of withdrawal symptoms. 

Restored Path Detox was created to provide a means to safely manage symptoms of withdrawal in a comfortable and dignified manner.

Unfortunately, there is often the misconception that this process can be undertaken alone, without the assistance of medical professionals trained to treat the physical and psychological symptoms of withdrawal. While that might be the case with certain drugs, withdrawal from alcohol and benzodiazepines, for example, can be fatal if not properly managed by highly trained specialists.

Oftentimes family members don’t understand why their loved one would continue consuming addictive substances despite the problems associated with continued use.

Challenges with school, employment, relationships, and overall health and wellness are frequently associated with chronic use of and dependence upon substances. For the chemically dependent individual, seeking help can be a challenging task. Many are terrified of the withdrawal process because they have tried to detox themselves and experienced severe withdrawal symptoms, or they have had a negative experience with facilities that lack the expertise necessary to adequately mitigate the effects of substance withdrawal. For them, seeking ways to continue consumption of the substance seems to be the only solution.

The public perception of those who become chemically dependent also can be a barrier to getting help.

 Shame and guilt frequently prevent individuals from seeking professional assistance, causing them to suffer in silence. Families can also suffer from denial of the truth about a loved one’s condition, preventing them from addressing the problem in a straightforward and effective manner.

Restored Path Detox was opened to help break down the barriers individuals face to seeking help.

Detox is the first of many steps on the road to recovery, and it has been shown that having a supportive detox experience can lead to a life of long-term recovery. Breaking the silence around substance use disorders and addiction is essential to reduce the stigma for those seeking help. When more people are open about their struggles, it helps to normalize the experience and shows that substance use disorders can happen to anyone. It also allows for a more open dialogue about addiction and recovery, which can lead to better understanding and more effective treatments. Our team at Restored Path Detox provides supportive counseling services alongside sophisticated withdrawal management to help guide individuals toward sustained recovery. We help people see that they are not alone, that help is available, and that withdrawal doesn’t have to be a painful or dangerous experience.

 

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s board-certified medical professionals and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Crystal Meth

Dangers of Crystal Meth

With the widespread use of crystal meth, it’s essential to recognize the signs that someone you know is at risk from it. Crystal meth users face risks from short-term and long-term effects, as well as overdosing and withdrawal symptoms that come with an attempt to quit using. Let’s look at some of the most common dangers of crystal meth and when its time to seek help

Crystal meth, or methamphetamine, is an illegal drug consumed by snorting, smoking, swallowing, or injecting it. Its short-term dangers include an irregular heartbeat and higher blood pressure. It can lead to paranoia, hallucinations, and extreme weight loss long-term. Signs of its use include rotting teeth, sores, and intense scratching. Someone using crystal meth can be aided by medical detox to safely manage the withdrawal process. That withdrawal process tends to be longer for people who inject the drug. 

How Is Crystal Meth Used?

Meth can be taken in a variety of ways. Seeing someone consume it one way doesn’t mean they limit themselves to that single method. For example, it can be smoked, swallowed in pill form, or snorted as a powder. The powder may also be mixed with water or alcohol and injected into the body. 

Warning Signs of Crystal Meth Use

Both physical characteristics and behavior give clues about someone’s meth use. Photos online typically show a “before” and “after’ of a person addicted to meth, with a noticeable change even in a relatively short amount of time. Physical changes can include skin issues, including sores, rotted teeth, drastic body weight drops, and they may appear frail. 

Tweaking, a term for when crystal meth users go days without sleeping, is an example of a psychological sign of this drug’s abuse. They may hallucinate and feel paranoid. 

While tweaking, the crystal meth user may move in a jerky manner, talk quickly, and get physically aggressive. This is a behavioral warning sign of abuse of this drug. Other signs include:

  • Frequent scratching or picking at their skin
  • Buying or making smoking paraphernalia
  • Hiding drug-related items
  • Stealing 
  • Selling their possessions
  • Frequently borrowing money

Other Short-Term Crystal Meth Dangers

Since crystal meth is manufactured and distributed illegally, the risk of other substances being added to it is high. If it’s cut with fentanyl, it can lead to overdose or death. Even without another drug added, meth users face a variety of other risks immediately. 

Body temperature rises upon use of meth. High body temperature can lead to unconsciousness or death. Their breathing will become rapid. Injecting the drug using shared or unclean needles can put a person at risk for disease. 

Long-Term Crystal Meth Risks

In addition to some of the outcomes mentioned in the warning signs, other long-term dangers from crystal meth use include anxiety, memory loss, and other changes to the brain. Their coordination could be affected, and they may struggle with verbal learning. Psychotic behavior during episodes of paranoia and hallucinations could lead to self-harm or harming others.  

Overdosing on Crystal Meth

Overdosing on crystal meth is possible and can be potentially life-threatening. It can disrupt blood flow to the brain and cause a stroke. It can create a blood clot affecting the flow to the heart. Other organ damage is possible as well. Those who overdose on meth may be unaware they’ve ingested a synthetic opioid that was added. 

Crystal Meth Withdrawal Symptoms

Withdrawal symptoms vary and are shaped by numerous factors, including the length of meth use, the amount used, the frequency of use, and whether they abused other substances. During meth withdrawal, a person may feel anxious or paranoid, they may hallucinate, and they may suffer from nausea and dehydration. Other withdrawal symptoms could include excessive sweating, fatigue, severe depression, and suicidal thoughts.

Detox for Crystal Meth Users

Restored Path Detox provides a safe detox from addictive substances for patients adults. A medical team provides 24-hour care as well as supportive counseling sessions with stress management techniques and relapse prevention tools. For someone with a history of crystal meth use, this medical detox is a valuable first step in getting on a path towards healing and making plans for continuing care once detox is complete. 

 

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s board-certified medical professionals and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Couple with addiction counselor for admission to detox

12 Signs You Need Detox

Evaluating your need for recovery help from drugs or alcohol shouldn’t be a complicated task. It’s possible to look at evidence in your life right now that suggests you would benefit from detox. We’ve compiled a list of twelve signs you or someone you love needs detox today.

Signs You Need Detox

1. Abusing alcohol or drugs is your priority every day.

You think about your next drug dose or drink a great deal of the day. Your preoccupation with substance use drives your daily decision-making. From the time you wake up to the time you go to sleep, nothing seems more important than drinking or using drugs.

2. You’re experiencing health problems related to substance use.

Chronic issues or new health issues made worse by substance use don’t seem to slow you down. You continue drinking or using drugs even when you know it’s hurting you. The issues may be physical, such as heart or lung issues. Also, they may be related to mental health, including depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress.

3. You’re experiencing financial instability related to substance use.

Constantly needing to borrow money, stealing money, or taking out payday loans with high interest rates may be routine options to cover the cost of your substance use. It may leave you unable to pay rent and bills or even hold down a job. You may have become increasingly dependent on a family member for housing, food, and transportation needs.

4. You’re facing legal consequences due to drug or alcohol use.

An arrest for driving under the influence is a clear sign of a substance use problem. Continuing to drink or do drugs while facing jail time or fines for your behavior should be a red flag that you’re in need of immediate detox.

5. Your family and friends always seem concerned about your drinking or drug use.

Your substance use has become a frequent topic of conversation whenever you’re with people who know and care about you. They may have offered support in your recovery needs already. You may have started avoiding these people to dodge the questions about your choices.

6. Your tolerance for a substance has increased.

You have noticed a need to take a drug in higher amounts or shortened the time in between doses to avoid withdrawal symptoms. You may realize your tolerance has increased and feel unable to quit using.

7. You suffered an injury while under the influence of drugs or alcohol or injured someone else.

Risky or careless behavior during substance use may have led to medical treatment or hospitalization. If you’ve injured someone else, the inability to take responsibility is a sign of your need for medical detox. If you’ve injured yourself while drinking, the doctor treating you would advise you to seek help for substance abuse immediately.

8. You experience withdrawal symptoms when you attempt to quit using.

Any time you have attempted to quit, withdrawal symptoms make it hard to avoid using again. You notice changes start to increase in severity the longer your body is eliminating drugs or alcohol. It feels unbearable on you, physically, mentally, and emotionally.

9. Your appearance has changed drastically.

You may have stopped bathing, brushing teeth, and doing other routine hygiene activities. Your clothes may be unclean. You may look unkempt to others. Your skin condition may worsen.

10. Your sleep is never consistent or adequate.

You have trouble with sleep on a regular basis. It may be sleeping too little, too much, or not being able to stay asleep. Drowsiness may be part of your normal waking hours. The lack of adequate and quality sleep may be worsening your mental health.

11. You openly lie about your substance use.

When asked about your drinking or drug use, you avoid answering honestly. You might change the subject or minimize how much you’re using. Even when there’s no direct consequences from the question, you might lie out of habit to keep people from having a true sense of the depth of your addiction.

12. You keep a hidden stash of substances to abuse.

If you live with others, you have found secret places to store bottles of alcohol, pills, or illegal substances. You feel anyone coming into your space might discover your stash and remove it. You might constantly check it when you get home to see if anyone has found it yet.

 

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Man suffering mental health effects from cocaine use.

Cocaine’s Effects on Mental Health

Cocaine’s impact on physical health is marked by its changes to the brain, but many people may be less aware of the drug’s effect on their mental health. Some of these effects may be noticeable to long-term cocaine users, even if they don’t necessarily associate the effects with their drug use. Learning some of the primary mental health effects of sustained cocaine use can create a foundation for recognizing the need for medical detox right now.

10 Effects of Cocaine on Mental Health

1. Cocaine use can result in seizures, which worsen depression, anxiety, or other co-occurring mental health disorders.

Cocaine users with existing mental health conditions may see an increase in the severity of their symptoms after experiencing seizures or other physical changes in their body. A chronic disorder connected to cocaine use may require long-term treatment, adding to the risk of making mental health symptoms more severe.

2. Cocaine use can create auditory hallucinations.

Hearing sounds that aren’t actually occurring can make a person feel unsafe, afraid, or paranoid. These feelings can be worsened as the hallucinations disrupt their ability to function normally at work and with friends and family.

3. A crash after cocaine use can produce a variety of mental health concerns.

The feeling of euphoria is over and replaced by feelings of anxiousness, irritability, or exhaustion. This “crash” period can last several days.

4. Cocaine withdrawal shows signs and symptoms that overlap with mental health disorder symptoms.

Cravings, poor concentration, and lethargy appear during withdrawal from cocaine use. These symptoms may last several weeks.

5. Cocaine can rob a person of adequate and quality sleep and result in depression.

Consistent loss of sleep can worsen mental health conditions or create new ones. For example, developing insomnia from drug use can result in depression or anxiety from an inability to fall asleep or stay asleep.

6. Long-term cocaine use can lead to paranoia.

Even when not actively using cocaine, a person with paranoia will feel like someone’s always watching them or “out to get them.” It can change their behavior as they attempt to avoid attention or openly accuse people of having bad intentions.

7. Cocaine use can lead to psychosis.

Losing touch with reality can be the result of long-term cocaine use or using large amounts in short periods of time. Their senses are affected as they see or hear things that aren’t present. They may be unaware of how their behavior looks to other people.

8. Cocaine use can lead to vertigo, making users feel their surroundings are chaotic.

Imagine the discomfort of seeing the world around you moving or spinning. Vertigo can make a person feel dizzy, imbalanced, and unable to focus.

9. Cocaine increases anxiety.

As a stimulant, cocaine can lead to anxiety or worsen existing anxiety in a person. The drug changes the way your brain receives and sends messages, speeds up heart rate, and raises blood pressure. The end result can be feeling nervous, restless, and unable to calm down.

10. Cocaine can lead to suicidal thoughts.

The impact of changing brain chemistry can make a person feel like their life is worthless. They may appear to take bigger risks or seem to act carelessly in unsafe environments. They may become desperate to harm themselves or even take their life.

5 Reasons to Use Medical Detox for Cocaine Abuse

 1. Cocaine withdrawal at home creates risk of complications.

Medical detox reduces the risk of complications related to cocaine withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can create harm to a patient’s health and well-being. Medical detox also provides an opportunity to treat certain symptoms with medication to alleviate discomfort during withdrawal.

2. Cocaine withdrawal at home may provide only limited care and support.

Even patients with medical professionals for support at home are unlikely to receive care 24/7 from them. It’s a demanding role to play for a family member, while medically-supervised detox monitors a patient round-the-clock. A medical team can respond to the emergence of new symptoms in real time and manage them right away.

3. Cocaine withdrawal at home doesn’t provide for addressing co-occurring physical and mental health conditions.

Someone who’s been abusing cocaine for years is likely to have unmet physical and mental health needs. They may be suffering from chronic health conditions or other health issues due to substance use. Their mental health disorders may involve anxiety, depression, or trauma. Medical detox addresses the comprehensive needs of a patient to help them prepare for the necessary recovery work ahead.

4. Cocaine withdrawal at home won’t lead to discovery of underlying conditions.

One factor contributing to substance use that may get missed is an underlying mental health disorder. This disorder can be a factor in why a person started to abuse cocaine and why they have struggled to quit using. A medically-supervised detox setting can provide a much-needed diagnosis for a person with depression, anxiety, or some other mental health concerns.

5. Cocaine withdrawal at home increases the chance for relapse before recovery gets underway. 

An unsupported detox attempt at home can lead to a quick relapse. In a medical detox, support and treatment reduces the risk of returning to cocaine abuse. In addition, a person learns what options are available to start treatment, whether inpatient or outpatient, after they finish the medical detox so they can make informed decisions about their own recovery needs.

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Patient with substance use disorder talking to doctor about how long it will take to detox.

Withdrawal Timelines: How Long Does It Take to Detox…

There is no one answer to the question of how does long it take to detox from different substances. The length of time required for detox will vary depending on a person’s individual physiology and history of substance abuse. There are, however, some general timelines that can give you an idea of what to expect during detox. In this blog post, we will take a look at the withdrawal timelines for several common drugs, the symptoms you may experience during each, and outline the importance of medically supervised detox services.

Alcohol Withdrawal Timeline

Alcohol withdrawal typically begins within eight hours of the last drink and can peak within 24-48 hours. Most people will begin to feel better after a few days. However, some may experience delirium tremens (DTs), a more severe form of withdrawal that can include hallucinations and seizures. DTs usually occur three to five days after the last drink and can be life-threatening if not treated properly. At Restored Path Detox, we provide 24/7 patient monitoring so that we are able to intervene quickly to keep patients safe. We can prescribe targeted medications to alleviate symptoms of alcohol withdrawal while simultaneously preventing dangerous symptoms.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Include:

  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Racing pulse
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Tremors
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Headache
  • Sweating
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

Stimulant Withdrawal Timeline

Withdrawal from stimulants like cocaine or methamphetamine generally starts within 24 hours of the last use. Symptoms include fatigue, depression, anxiety, irritability, and insomnia. These symptoms can last for several weeks or even months in some cases if not treated medically.

Symptoms of Cocaine Withdrawal Include:

  • Depressed mood
  • Ongoing tiredness or lethargy
  • Insomnia or hypersomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Paranoia
  • Increased appetite
  • Problems with concentration
  • Slowed thoughts and movements
  • Intense drug cravings

Because the psychological symptoms of cocaine withdrawal are typically more severe and disruptive, we offer psychiatric services and antipsychotic medications whenever necessary. In addition, behavioral therapy is an essential part of stimulant detox, so we offer individual and group therapy sessions facilitated by a licensed therapist.

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiates like heroin or prescription painkillers generally produce withdrawal symptoms within 12 hours of the last dose. These symptoms can sometimes last several days to a week or more. To help keep patients comfortable and safe, we provide 24-hour medical supervision and professional care. If needed, we will administer and carefully monitor FDA-approved medications to reduce the severity of opiate withdrawal symptoms.

Symptoms of Opioids Withdrawal Include:

  • Nervousness or anxiety
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Frequent yawning
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Muscle cramps/body aches
  • Runny nose
  • Excessive sweating
  • Hot and cold flashes
  • Goosebumps

Why is Medical Detox Important?

There are many benefits to medically supervised drug detox. First and foremost, it will allow a person to safely and effectively detox from drugs. This is a crucial first step in recovery, as it will help to break the physical dependence on drugs. Medically supervised drug detox will also provide the opportunity to receive counseling and other forms of support. This will help a patient be able to understand addiction and begin to develop a plan for recovery. 

Since no two patients have the same use history, our team of medical professionals complete a full assessment to determine the right approach to detoxification. As a result, we can immediately identify and treat symptoms and create a tailored treatment plan unique to each person’s needs and recovery goals.

As you can see, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to how long it takes to detox from different substances. Instead, the timeline will vary depending on the individual and the substances used. For most people, drug use doesn’t begin with addiction. For many, it may start as a way to unwind, relieve stress, or in the form of a doctor’s prescription. But over time, drug use can lead to drug tolerance, paving the way for dependence and addiction. 

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Patient talking to doctor about what to expect during medical detox

What to Expect During Medical Detox

Detoxing from drugs or alcohol can be a difficult physical and emotional process. Therefore, knowing what to expect during medical detox is essential to prepare you for the challenges ahead. In this blog post, we will discuss the different phases of medical detoxification (detox) and what you can expect during each one. We will also talk about the importance of seeking professional help during detox to keep you or your loved one safe and comfortable.

What is Detox?

Medical detox is the first step in treating a substance use disorder. This process usually occurs in hospitals, detox facilities, or residential treatment facilities. At Restored Path Detox, we provide the option of detoxing in a standalone, state-of-the-art facility to maximize the comfort of our patients. 

Drug detox is a process that helps your body rid itself of the toxins associated with drug use. When you stop using drugs, your body is suddenly bombarded with various chemicals that it has to eliminate. This can lead to uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Detoxification that is medically supervised can help ease these symptoms and make the process of quitting drugs less difficult and painful.

The detox process can result in a range of physical and psychological symptoms. Because of this, we monitor patients 24/7 so that we can make in-the-moment adjustments to a patient’s detox plan.

Physical Withdrawal Symptoms may include:

  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sweating
  • Physical weakness
  • Shaking or tremors

Psychological Withdrawal Symptoms may include:

  • Nervousness
  • Anxiety
  • Tension or worry
  • Dysphoria
  • Serious Withdrawal Symptoms

Potentially Life-Threatening Withdrawal Symptoms may include:

  • Dehydration from vomiting or diarrhea
  • Rapid breathing
  • Delirium tremens, or DTs (a cluster of intense withdrawal symptoms, including seizures)
  • Severe depression or anxiety leading to suicidal ideation
  • Increased heart rate or irregular heartbeat
  • Severe trembling

What are the Phases of Detox?

The first phase of detox is the withdrawal phase. This is when your body begins to adjust to the absence of drugs or alcohol. During this phase, you will likely experience a variety of symptoms as your body adjusts to being without drugs or alcohol. These symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, shaking, and anxiety. The severity of your symptoms will depend on the substance you are detoxing from and how long you have been using it. It is important to remember that withdrawal symptoms are temporary and will eventually subside.

The second phase of detox is the stabilization phase. During this phase, your body will begin to adjust to being without drugs or alcohol, and your symptoms will start to improve. You may still experience some physical and emotional discomfort during this time, but it should be less severe than during the withdrawal phase. You may also start to see some improvement in your physical health during this phase. This is a good time to start thinking about your next steps in treatment, such as entering a rehabilitation program. During this phase, we encourage you to begin attending our supportive counseling, both individually and in groups.

The third and final phase of detox is the recovery phase. During this phase, your body has fully adjusted to being without drugs or alcohol, and you will begin to feel better physically and emotionally. This is when you will start to feel like yourself again. You will have more energy, and your mood will improve. You may also start to see some changes in your physical appearance, such as weight loss or an increase in muscle mass.

This is a necessary time to focus on your recovery and begin making plans for your future. If you have not already done so, this is a good time to seek professional help from a treatment center or therapist. Recovery is a lifelong process, but it starts with taking the first step of seeking help.

How Long Does Detox Last?

Detox typically takes between 4 and 10 days on average. Different people experience this differently, and it depends on a variety of factors, including:

  • Amount of alcohol/drugs consumed
  • Length of time alcohol/drugs have been used
  • The state of their physical and mental well-being

At Restored Path Detox, we do a complete assessment of our patients at admission so that we can customize their detox experience and make sure to provide the exact care each patient requires.

Why is Medical Detox Important?

Medical detox is an important step for those struggling with drug addiction. We provide a safe and comfortable detoxification environment, which helps reduce the risk of relapse. When someone detoxes from drugs or alcohol on their own, they experience uncomfortable and dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Having medical professionals on hand 24/7 ensures that these symptoms are monitored and managed safely and comfortably. This can make all the difference in a successful detox.

Detox is just the first step in treating a substance use disorder. After you have detoxed from the drugs, you will need to address the underlying causes of alcohol or other drug use. This may mean a combination of therapy, medication, and support groups. You may also begin or continue working with a therapist during this time. We provide all of our patients with a continuing care plan to make an easy transition to their next phase of recovery. Referring professionals are a critical component of this process.

The Solution at Restored Path Detox

Recovery is possible with the right help and support. If you or someone you know is struggling with a substance use disorder, please seek help. Our compassionate medical team and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. There are resources available to you, and there is hope for a better future.

 

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Kratom Pills

What is Kratom?

Kratom is a natural herbal compound with effects resembling those of narcotics and stimulants, yet it’s not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for any therapeutic use. It’s made available as a recreational product and has shown up illegally in over-the-counter products. These products include dietary supplements and bulk dietary ingredients that have been seized by the FDA. Learning the side effects of Kratom abuse is a first step towards making choices to start recovery with medically-supervised detox.

Defining Kratom

Kratom originates from a tree in Southeast Asia. Its leaves contain chemical compounds that can provide potential benefits to the body. It’s commonly sold in stores and online as an herbal supplement. Its usage can be for relieving pain, treating anxiety or depression, or treating opioid dependence. Some people using it as part of opioid treatment credit Kratom for relief during withdrawal symptoms.

How is Kratom Taken?

Forms of Kratom vary. Most commonly, it’s consumed in a capsule or powder form that contains raw plant matter. Kratom powder can be mixed with drinks or food. The plant’s leaves can be brewed in making tea. A liquid extract of Kratom is also available. Despite its availability, the drug’s potentially harmful effects are important to recognize.

Side Effects of Kratom

A person’s experience with Kratom’s side effects will be influenced by a variety of factors. The list includes the amount of Kratom ingested, the concentration and strength of the dose, the presence of other drugs in the blood system, and underlying medical conditions. A person’s prior experience with Kratom abuse also can be a factor in the duration and severity of side effects.

The side effects can resemble both an opioid and a stimulant. The opioid-like effects may include an increase in energy, higher level of alertness, and a faster pulse. The stimulant-like effects may include relaxation, pain relief, and even confusion. The side effects list may be expanded if other drugs are mixed with Kratom.

Signs of Kratom Abuse

Signs of Kratom abuse can show up as physical, mental, behavioral, or emotional changes in a person. The list of emotional signs of Kratom abuse include feeling agitated or anxious, feeling depressed, having emotional outbursts, emotionally detaching from others, and feeling generally irritable.

Kratom Abuse’s Physical Symptoms

  • Breathing problems
  • Changes to skin color
  • Constipation
  • Inability to experience pain
  • Increased energy (small doses)
  • Nausea
  • Perspiration
  • Sedation (larger doses)
  • Sleep issues
  • Tolerance for the drug
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Weight changes
  • Withdrawal

Kratom Abuse’s Cognitive Symptoms

  • Cravings
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Delusions
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Hallucinations
  • Heightened focus
  • High levels of alertness
  • Panic
  • Poor decision-making

Kratom Abuse’s Behavioral Symptoms

  • Abusing Kratom after facing serious consequences
  • Erratic, violent, or aggressive behaviors
  • Inability to stop using
  • Increasing amount of Kratom used and for longer durations
  • Neglect of personal responsibilities
  • Overly talkative
  • Spending more time obtaining the drug and recovering
  • Tearfulness

5 Reasons to Use Medical Detox for Kratom Abuse

 1. It eliminates the risk of complications from Kratom withdrawal.

Withdrawal from Kratom affects a person in numerous ways. Some of them can be more severe than others, especially when left untreated. Medical detox provides a means of reducing the risk of medical complications as well as psychological problems related to withdrawal. In some cases, prescription medications may be needed to treat certain symptoms.

2. It provides round-the-clock care.

A medically-supervised detox provides patients with 24/7 care as they experience withdrawal symptoms. Whether new symptoms appear day or night, monitoring of a detox patient enables the medical team to manage those symptoms immediately.

3. It can address co-occurring physical and mental health conditions.

A person abusing Kratom may be living with co-occurring physical issues and mental health needs. The physical issues may stem from chronic conditions or injuries. The mental health concerns may relate to trauma, anxiety, or depression. Medical detox provides comprehensive treatment for these needs on a daily basis.

4. It can provide diagnosis of underlying conditions.

During a medical detox, the diagnosis of mental health disorders can happen. This type of disorder may be affecting a patient’s ability to stop using Kratom and start their recovery.

5. It sets up a patient for success in transitioning to inpatient or outpatient care.

As a first step in a longer recovery process, medical detox equips a patient with a personalized treatment plan. By the time they complete the detox, they are given the help to make informed treatment decisions for themselves on what steps they want to take next in their own recovery.

 

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Woman buying MDMA in a club

What Does MDMA Do To Your Body?

MDMA users turn to this synthetic drug for feelings of pleasure, yet may be unaware of how it affects the body in other ways. Even taking low to moderate doses can produce side effects with discomfort. Higher doses can lead to more severe consequences, even death.

What is MDMA?

MDMA is short for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. You may recognize the “methamphetamine” portion of its full name. On the street, the drug gets called by other names, including Molly, Ecstasy, E, X, XTC, and others. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has yet to approve it for therapeutic use so it remains a recreational drug at the moment.

Taken by mouth, reaction to the drug can begin within 30-45 minutes and may last several hours. Those reactions may be increased energy, sense of pleasure, and altered sensations. The effects will depend on the dose, which can be between 50 and 150 milligrams.

Side Effects and Dangers during Use

Side effects will vary depending on the size of the dose. Low-to-moderate doses include teeth grinding, muscle aches, and skin tingles. Higher doses can result in hallucinations, convulsions, and even death.

Low to Moderate MDMA Doses

  • Anxiety
  • Dilated pupils
  • Empathy
  • Feelings of closeness to others
  • Feelings of well-being
  • Heightened sensations (sight, hearing, touch)
  • Increased blood pressure & heart rate
  • Increased body temperature
  • Increased confidence and energy
  • Jaw clenching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lowered inhibitions
  • Muscle aches and stiffness
  • Nausea
  • Paranoia, aggression and psychosis
  • Poor muscle control and unsteadiness
  • Skin tingles
  • Sweating
  • Teeth grinding

Higher Doses of MDMA

  • Brain Hemorrhage
  • Convulsions
  • Death
  • Floating sensations
  • Hallucinations
  • High body temperature
  • High blood pressure
  • Increased heartbeat
  • Irrational or bizarre behavior
  • Vomiting

MDMA’s Next-Day Effects on the Brain

MDMA users feeling the drug’s effects drop may take a second dose to restore the feelings of euphoria. However, the sense of pleasure felt that day gets replaced by a range of unwelcome experiences the day after. The main cause for these effects is a sharp drop in serotonin levels as the body begins its withdrawal.

  • Anxiety
  • Decreased appetite
  • Dehydration
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Dizziness
  • Impulsiveness
  • Irritability or aggression
  • Loneliness
  • Memory loss
  • Severe fatigue or weakness
  • Spike in body temperature

Long-Term MDMA Addiction Effects

Common long-term effects from MDMA addiction include depression, anxiety and paranoia.

Sustained use of the recreational drug also can lead to liver, kidney, and heart problems. People abusing MDMA who have pre-existing health conditions face a higher risk of complications and illness.

Some would argue that the worst long-term effect of ecstasy is the mental health risks that come with taking the drug, especially if you take it for prolonged periods. Overdose and/or extensive ecstasy use can be harmful on a physical, psychological, emotional and interpersonal level.

Here’s a partial list of potential health-related issues related to MDMA long-term addiction.

  • Cardiovascular collapse
  • Convulsions
  • Degenerated nerve branches and nerve endings
  • Heart palpitations
  • Hemorrhaging
  • Kidney failure
  • Liver damage
  • Loss of overall brain mass
  • Memory impairment
  • Nasal mucus damage
  • Nasal cartilage damage
  • Psychosis
  • Regular nose bleeds
  • Toxicity to the brain

Danger of Accidental Fentanyl Overdose with MDMA

Fentanyl is tasteless, colorless, and not visible when mixed with other substances. Recreational MDMA may be mixed with a dose of Fentanyl without the knowledge of the person taking the drugs. This mix can have dangerous consequences.

Because the purity of MDMA bought on the street is always questionable, people need to be aware of the risks that come from taking both types of drugs at the same time. Without knowing if there’s an opioid like Fentanyl in the MDMA, a person can be sent into a cardiac emergency caused by respiratory depression that slows breathing and reduces oxygen in the blood. The Fentanyl overdose may show up in other symptoms typical of opioid abuse, including cold and clammy skin, limpness in body, blue-colored lips and fingernails, and loss of consciousness.

5 Reasons to Use Medical Detox for MDMA Abuse

1. Medical detox eliminates the risk of complications from MDMA withdrawal.

Medical detox provides a safe and comfortable space for a patient to experience withdrawal symptoms. Complications that may arise at home are often psychological in nature  and can be related to symptoms such as hallucinations, psychosis, and panic attacks. Prescription medications may be used as part of treatment of MDMA withdrawal symptoms.

2. Medical detox provides round-the-clock care.

Medically-supervised detox is done in an environment with constant care. A patient is monitored as they move through the withdrawal stages and can be treated right away as needed when new symptoms appear or existing symptoms intensify.

3. Medical detox can address co-occurring physical and mental health conditions.

During this kind of detox, the medical team can observe any co-occurring physical and mental health needs of a patient. These may include chronic health conditions, untreated injuries, anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress.

4. Medical detox can provide diagnosis of underlying conditions.

Medically-supervised detox can be a place where undiagnosed mental health disorders get discovered. The diagnosis of PTSD, anxiety, depression or other co-occurring mental health disorder helps a patient understand what factors may have been preventing them from getting sober and staying sober in the past.

5. Medical detox sets up a patient for success in transitioning to inpatient or outpatient care.

Detox is considered a valuable first step in the recovery process. A patient receiving  a personalized treatment plan becomes informed about the options available to them next. Before they complete a medical detox stay, they can begin to make informed decisions about what they want their treatment to look like next.

 

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Opioid pills

What do Opioids do to the Body?

Opioid abuse has a range of effects on the body. Opioids are typically used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. They may be prescribed following surgery or an injury. Also, prescription opioids may be part of a treatment plan for cancer. Treating chronic pain, such as back pain, is another use of this type of drug.

Opioids work to counteract pain by interacting with opioid receptors in the cells. This controls the pain while also producing a relaxed state in the user. While their prescribed use is common, opioids have a range of effects on the body. Some of them can be quite serious. Off-label or recreational use of opioids presents additional health risks including overdose and death.

Short-Term Effects of Opioid Abuse

Moving from prescribed use of opioids to a level of misuse can lead to several types of outcomes. A person can go from relaxed and happy with pain under control and feeling a sense of euphoria to noticing signs of physical changes. Drowsiness during normal waking hours is one sign. Another is slowed breathing from the depression of the respiratory system. Nausea and constipation may appear. Short-term opioid abuse can lead to a loss of consciousness, with additional risks if it occurs when driving or working in a high-risk environment. Another serious outcome of opioid abuse is  going into a coma.

Long-Term Effects of Opioid Abuse

Sustained abuse of opioids leads to an increased amount taken each time and more frequent use as tolerance for the drug elevates. The outcome for a person can be severe, starting with physical dependence and overdose and ending with death. The death risk increases from a higher potential for contracting infectious diseases through intravenous drug use and injuries from being in accidents. Mental effects may be significant, too, and include an increase in symptoms associated with anxiety or depression.

GI System

Long-term opioid abuse can lead to GI problems. These include chronic constipation. Bowel obstruction is an example of a GI complication stemming from opioid abuse that can lead to hospitalization. Chronic constipation can also affect mental health conditions, such as intensifying the symptoms of depression or anxiety.

Respiratory System

Long-term opioid abuse can result in multiple respiratory problems They include slowed or irregular breathing. In the case of overdose, slowed breathing could become respiratory arrest when breathing stops. The outcome of a loss of oxygen to the brain could be coma, brain damage, or death.

Signs and Symptoms of Opioid Addiction

Signs and symptoms of opioid addiction can be emotional, physical, or behavioral. An emotional sign may appear as a person often becoming irritable or nervous. You may see quick changes to their mood, including a tendency to express or exhibit sadness. Physical signs of opioid addiction may be the result of a lack of maintaining hygiene practices, leaving teeth unbrushed, and not regularly bathing or cleaning clothes. Behavioral changes may be the most noticeable signs. A person addicted to opioids may remain isolated frequently and avoid family and friends. They may miss appointments and ignore commitments. You may notice they ask for money without naming a reason. Arrest or legal issues may be another sign of a person with opioid addiction.

Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

Signs of opioid withdrawal may begin within 12 hours of a last dose. Strong cravings for the drug are among the signs. Like any drug, factors influencing the duration and severity of withdrawal are shaped by gender, body chemistry, genetic makeup, how the substance was administered (swallowed, snorted, injected, etc.), and whether other substances were used at the same time. Typically, withdrawal symptoms from opioid use last 3-5 days. In severe cases, they can last for months.

Within 12 Hours of Last Dose

  • Anxiety
  • Cravings
  • Goosebumps
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Yawning
  • Runny nose
  • Watery eyes
  • Widened (dilated) pupils
  • Body aches
  • Sweating
  • Vomiting
  • Belly cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Shaking
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Rapid breathing
  • High blood pressure
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

5 Reasons to Use Medical Detox for Opioid Abuse

1. Medical detox eliminates the risk of complications from opioid withdrawal.

Medical detox allows a person to move through withdrawal with symptoms managed by professionals, ensuring a safe and comfortable experience. Prescription medications may be used as part of treatment.

2. Medical detox provides round-the-clock care.

Medically-supervised detox allows a patient to receive round-the-clock monitoring and care as they move through the stages of withdrawal. As symptoms appear at any time, day or night, the medical team can manage them.

3. Medical detox can address co-occurring physical and mental health conditions.

Co-occurring physical and mental health needs can be addressed and treated during a medical detox. Physical needs may stem from chronic conditions, and mental health concerns may include anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress. A patient whose mental health and physical wellness are prioritized during this period is more likely to be prepared for the comprehensive recovery work ahead.

4. Medical detox can provide diagnosis of underlying conditions.

Medically-supervised detox also provides an opportunity for undiagnosed mental health disorders to be discovered. The treatment team may uncover a co-occurring disorder that has been a factor in a patient’s previous struggle to start recovery.

5. Medical detox sets up a patient for success in transitioning to inpatient or outpatient care.

A personalized treatment plan provided during medical detox equips patients with valuable information on how to make their next treatment decision.

 

Restored Path’s Solution

Restored Path Detox is DFW’s premier location for sophisticated medical detox. Conveniently located in Frisco, we provide a safe sanctuary for healing that is also a state-of-the-art detoxification facility for a wide range of substances. Our compassionate physicians and therapists want you to get well and are committed to removing any existing barriers to your care. Restored Path’s team of board-certified physicians and highly qualified RNs have extensive critical care experience and are available to monitor your detox program 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you or a loved one are struggling with drug or alcohol use, call us today and take your first step towards recovery: 561-841-1268.

Call to begin your journey to wellness today.

If you or someone you love has been suffering at the hands of a drug or alcohol use disorder, Restored Path Detox can help. We will work alongside you to provide the most comprehensive and individualized medically-monitored detox program available.

Or send us a message